Working with the flowers….

If you have a deck of the Wildflower Cards, spread your cards out in front of you so that you can see the images of the flowers, and notice which one you are drawn to. I’ll demonstrate, showing you how you can work with the flower spirits for healing and guidance, and then perhaps you can try this yourself! Remember to be playful and trust yourself: you will access your intuitive wisdom by allowing your imagination to take you on a journey.

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For me today, it was Tomato Bush, that drew me in, with her beautiful purple petals, and the warm sunset glow cast over her in the photograph.

Holding the card in my hand, I gaze at her image and imagine being with her in the red centre of Australia, surrounded by red sand and open space that stretches as far as the eye can see.

Like two women sitting at a campfire, we sit across from one another. Our ‘campfire’ is the red dirt and the setting sun. As the sun goes down, I feel Wild Tomato Bush drawing me into the wavy lines of the red sand-dunes. It feels like we are travelling, winding along through the sand like snakes. I follow her and she guides me to a hollow in the sand. I curl up in the sand and she covers me with her branches. Continue reading

My love for holism

While writing Wildflower Spirit Journey, there was a subtle theme that kept popping up for me over and over again: holism. I saw it in my mother’s nature-based spirituality, the Aboriginal art I was surrounded by as a child, and the yin-yang teaching style given to me by my spirit guides, Khryse and Tomas.

Both my grandmother and my great-uncle had an enormous childhood influence on my life, imprinting within me their love for nature, science, anatomy and physiology, helping people, wildflowers and photography. My grandmother was a doctor. My great-uncle was an arid zone botanist. And there have been many times through my life I have been tempted to walk in their footsteps, but my love for holism has steered me in other directions. Continue reading

Healing the Ancestral Line

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This is one of the flower spirits featured in my book “Wildflower Spirit Journey through Central Australia’. The common name is Western Nightshade. The nightshade family of plants includes potatoes, capsicum, egg-plant, tobacco, pituri and tomato. This is a wild tomato, but unlike the other Central Australian wild tomatoes (of which there are many!), Western Nightshade has 4 purple petals instead of five. It still has the characteristic plump round fruit, which can vary in colour from green to yellow to red to brown to black, depending on the particular species and the stage of fruiting.

Continue reading