From mountain devils to coastal pigfaces

PART ONE

In December 2016 my husband and I went on one of our adventures, an epic 5-week journey through five states of Australia. Our last journey before this was an overseas trek through England, Ireland, Amsterdam, Prague, Germany and Austria, a couple of years ago, the highlight of which was a tandem paraglide off the Austrian Alps. As always, I came back from this journey loving my Australian home more than ever, with a strong urge to make our next journey home-based, but a back injury had me grounded for a while.

While we were waiting out my recovery time, Spirit colluded with my great uncle, encouraging me to take a step back from work and focus instead on writing a family history. “Write my story” said my uncle, and in the next breath he asked that the story be not just about him, but my grandparents as well. “Exploring your roots will help you heal your root chakra” my spirit guides explained to me. Continue reading

Daisy Bush

Screenshot 2015-10-08 08.28.28Given the connection I made with Utju, I’m embarrassed to say this was the one community where we got into trouble for going into the wrong area while looking for flowers. The two young men who told us we were heading into sacred men’s territory were very patient and polite. We quickly turned around and headed back out on to the main road. Seeing a variation in leaf colour amongst the trees, I wondered if it might be a mistletoe, so we pulled over and I went to investigate.

I had to scramble through a narrow, dry streambed with steep banks and weave my way through a maze of spiky spinifex to reach the nearest tree. Unfortunately the mistletoe wasn’t in flower, but as I stepped back from the tree, I looked down and discovered a magnificent daisy bush at my feet. Daisy bush belongs to the Olearia genus. In her book, Grandma says: “Olearia are perennials, and are only found in Australia, Papua New Guinea and New Zealand.” Continue reading

Tie-Cutting Mistletoe

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I found this mistletoe outside my great-uncle Peter’s home in Mutitjulu, the Aboriginal community at Uluru. This mistletoe helps us let go of other people and move on with our lives. While this can include moving on after relationship break-ups and the death of loved ones, tie-cutting doesn’t necessarily bring about the end of a relationship. Quite often, it improves relationships, because tie-cutting removes the old rot in the space between people’s hearts. I cut ties with my father and my husband last year with the help of Mother Mary and Archangel Michael. Since then, my relationships with both men have been healthier and happier. This flower spirit also heals trauma associated with separation anxiety. Being forced to move on too quickly after loss can create wounds that cause clingy behaviour due to fear of loss.

Besides cutting ties with people, we can also cut ties with our own outworn identities and behaviours. This spirit flower helped me by reaching into my solar plexus and grasping hold of a blockage I had stored in this part of my body. You are holding on to the past, clinging tight to old ideas about who you are. You need to let go and shed your old skin. Have faith in your capacity to evolve, even if you cannot clearly see where your next transformation will take you. Continue reading

Fan Flowers : Heart-opening, Space-expanding

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The next morning we rose early and drove to Ti Tree. On the way there, I found some fan flowers on the side of the road. Grandma says: “The name scaevola comes from a Latin word meaning left-handed, because of the one-sided shape.”

There are about 90 species of fan flower. Most of them are Australian, and seven of them are specifically Central Australian. Fan flower spirit medicine expands and opens our chakras, especially the heart chakra. They broaden our sense of personal space, helping us feel more open and expansive in heart, mind and body. Continue reading

Humility Fuchsia

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After completing work in this community, we made a brief detour into Palm Valley for lunch. This was my favourite thrill-a-minute four-wheel drive road. Not only was it an adrenaline rush because it was so challenging, the landscape was stunning and ever-changing. We didn’t have time to walk deeper into the valley, but the road itself and the flowers along the way more than compensated. After being forced to drive past many fuchsias on the roads north of Alice Springs due to time constraints, I became a little obsessed with fuchsias for the rest of the trip.

I found myself searching for a black and white fuchsia that I kept seeing in my mind. I couldn’t work out what it was and why it seemed important. Perhaps it was one Grandma had shown me as a child. Fuchsia was one of my grandmother’s favourite flowers and my grandparents had loved visiting Palm Valley, so it felt special to find my first fuchsia here. Continue reading

Convolvulus Flower – Rebirth

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Leaving our home town of Darwin in Northern Australia, we headed south on the Stuart Highway. The green landscape around us gradually became more arid as the kilometres ticked by.

We spent our first night at the Daly Waters campground. The next day we had been driving for a few hours when Stephen spotted a beautiful white flower, so we decided to stop for lunch and investigate. As we got closer we realised it was a Convolvulus vine creeping over a tree.

If I had met this flower a few months earlier, I would have walked right on by without connecting. I’m an independent person, and the idea of a plant that climbs over and suffocates other plants has never appealed to me. Thankfully, my friend Kathleen had recently softened my view on vines by introducing me to a vine essence she made. Connecting deeply with Kathleen’s vine essence helped me understand that vine spirit medicine helps to balance us if we are too independent or not independent enough. It also helps us to let go when we are struggling with grief. Continue reading